Wednesday, 19 June 2013

WHY WAS COLIN FLETCHER GIVEN AN OBE?

I refuse to call him "Reverend" or any other such stuff and nonsense. These old dodgers would be called a few other choice names by Jesus Christ if he was physically walking the earth, I know they would, because Jesus would not have kept His mouth shut to this putrid bull shit. But thats why He was crucified wasn't it?

http://www.ctbi.org.uk/AK/22

ALL THESE WICKED CREATURES KNOW THAT THE CHILDREN OF THE POOR ARE BEING STOLEN AND SOLD IN THE SECRET FAMILY COURTS. THE WHOLE BLASTED CHURCH KNOWS! WHAT ARE THEY DOING, PONCING AROUND PRETENDING TO BE HOLIER THAN THOU? GETTING THE CONGREGATION TO SING STUPID ACTION SONGS ABOUT SUPERMAN, MAKING DAMNED SURE NO-ONE SAYS ANYTHING ABOUT THE SECRET FAMILY COURT HUMAN TRAFFICKING AND PINDOWN INSTUTUIONAL CHILD ABUSE AND MASS MURDER OF THE ELDERLY OR ANYTHING ELSE THAT THE GOVERNMENTS WHO PULL THEIR STRINGS DONT WANT ANYONE TO TALK ABOUT OR EVEN PRAY ABOUT!

I AM THE LADY WHO MICHAEL HAYES (VICAR OF ST MARY'S SUPPOSED TO BE PROTESTANT CHURCH IN MARKET DRAYTON, BUT HAYES WAS ACTUALLY A CATHOLIC, EDUCATED AT MAYNOOTH IN IRELAND, SO BASICALLY THE PEOPLE OF MARKET DRAYTON HAD A CATHOLIC RUNNING THEIR PROTESTANT CHURCH!)ACTUALLY TRIED TO STOP ME FROM PRAYING TO JESUS CHRIST ABOUT THE PINDOWN CHILD ABUSE AND THE SECRET FAMILY COURT ABUSE, I AM ONE OF THE STAFFORDSHIRE PINDOWN CHILD ABUSE VICTIMS AND SUFFERED 7 YEARS OF HORRIFIC PERSECUTION IN THE SECRET FAMILY COURTS, AND CURRENTLY MY FAMILY IS BEING TARGETTED FOR EVEN MORE MALICIOUS ABUSE BY ATOS, THE IT PARTNERS OF THE BBC, WHO HAVE TRIED TO COVER UP PINDOWN, SECRET FAMILY COURT HUMAN TRAFFICKING AND THE JIMMY SAVILE ABUSE AND OTHER CHILD ABUSE. I FEEL LIKE I AM FIGHTING WITH DEMONS, WHICH PROBABLY IS A PRETTY ACCURATE ASSESSMENT OF THE SITUATION!!!!!


who we are


trustees



Nominations from the Churches
selected by the Nominations Committee

The Revd Gwynn ap Gwilym - nominated by the Church in Wales

Gwynn ap Gwilym was educated at the Universities of Wales (Bangor), Ireland (Galway) and Oxford (Wycliffe Hall), and he holds Masters' degrees in Welsh, Theology and Hebrew. He is an ordained minister in the Church in Wales, has served in the dioceses of Bangor and Llandaff, and was also a part-time lecturer in Hebrew and Old Testament Studies in the United Theological College, Aberystwyth. He is now full-time Adviser to the Bench of Bishops on Church Affairs and Language. He is chaired bard, a published poet and novelist and has written extensively on Welsh literature. He has also published a commentary on the Book of Deuteronomy. His most recent book (2008) is a metrical version of the psalms in Welsh, Salmau Cân Newydd.


The Most Revd Richard Clarke, Archbishop of Armagh - nominated by the Church of Ireland

Richard Clarke was educated at Trinity College Dublin and King's College, London. He was ordained in 1975, held a number of posts within the Church of Ireland, and was elected Bishop of Meath and Kildare in 1996. He became Archbishop of Armagh in December 2012. He is currently Chair of the Church of Ireland Unity Committee. He is author of And is it True? (2000), The Unharmonious Blacksmith (2002) and A Whisper of God (2006).


The Revd Dr Mary Cotes - nominated by the Baptist Union of Great Britain

Mary serves as Ecumenical Moderator in Milton Keynes. She took up that position in 2003, having previously ministered within an LEP in Pontypridd. She is a member of the Faith and Unity Executive with BUGB, was recently one of the BUGB delegates to the CEC Assembly, and has wide and deep ecumenical understanding.


The Right Revd Colin Fletcher OBE, Bishop of Dorchester - nominated by the Church of England

Ordained in 1976, Colin Fletcher was a Tutor at Wycliffe Hall and then Vicar of Holy Trinity in Margate before becoming Chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1993. During his time as Chaplain, he was Co-Chair of the Lambeth Group which was set up to advise the Government on the 'spiritual aspects of the millennium'. He has been Bishop of Dorchester since his appointment to the Episcopate in 2000. He is Chairman of the Bible Reading Fellowship Council, a member of the Editorial Board of the Anvil Trust, and a member of the Steering Group and the Fresh Expressions group of the South Central Regional Training Partnership.


Bishop Paul Hendricks - nominated by the Catholic Bishops Conference of England and Wales

Bishop Paul is auxiliary Bishop of Southwark and a member of the Bishops' Conference Department for Dialogue and Unity. Within the department he has specific responsibility for engagement with the Ecumenical Instruments, and therefore ideally placed to act as a Trustee of CTBI.


The Very Revd Sheilagh Kesting - nominated by the Church of Scotland

Sheilagh Kesting is the first female minister to become Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland and currently the Secretary of the Church of Scotland Committee on Ecumenical Relations. Born in Stornoway, she was educated at Edinburgh University, and was inducted to Overtown Parish Church, Lanarkshire in 1980, and in 1986 was inducted to the newly united congregation of St Andrew's High, Musselburgh.

In 1993, her commitment to ecumenical work led her to take up post as Secretary to the Committee on Ecumenical Relations. She has served as secretary to the ecumenical conversations, SCIFU (Scottish Churches Initiative for Union), the talks with the United Free Church which led to the signing of a Covenant, continuing talks with the Free Church and joint secretary of the Joint Commission on Doctrine (Church of Scotland/Roman Catholic). She is a member of the Scottish Churches' Forum and a former trustee of CTBI. At various times she has represented the Church of Scotland at international assemblies, often facilitating group discussions. Her interests are listed as gardening, singing oratorio in a choir and photography.


Deacon Gwenllian Knighton - nominated by the Methodist Church in Britain

Gwenllian Knighton is a member of the Diaconal Order in the Methodist Church in Britain. She was ordained a deacon in 1991 and has served in pastoral appointments, working with community development projects and was Training and Development Officer for 6 years in North Wales. Gwenllian served as ecumenical officer in the Cymru District and was Secretary of the Council of Methodism in Wales. She is a longstanding member of the International Ecumenical Fellowship while her previous background is in language teaching. She was one of the MCB representatives to CEC General Assembly. Gwenllian has a very practical approach to ecumenism and has a depth and wisdom which is valued. She is a Welsh speaker.


The Revd Elizabeth Nash - nominated by the United Reformed Church

Elizabeth is a senior URC minister. She has served as Training Officer for the E Midlands Synod for 15 years and, although taking early retirement from stipendiary service this summer, she will continue serving the church. As the incoming convener of our Equal Opportunities Committee, she will be a member of the URC Mission Council and General Assembly. Elizabeth was a member of the Ecumenical Committee from 1998 to 2002 returning as its Convener from 2004 to 2008. The earlier period saw the union between the URC and the Scottish Congregational Church, and the latter saw a significant restructuring in which ecumenical work was remitted to a new Mission Committee. Elizabeth not only ensured the delivery of the agenda through a time of upheaval but gave personal support to the staff members affected. She has represented the URC at the CTE Forum, the CTBI Assembly, the Methodist Conference and the World Alliance of Reformed Churches Assembly. Elizabeth brings to the CTBI Trustees human resources and governance skills. Although not an HR professional, she has consistently challenged the church to meet the highest standards of professional practice, particularly in the area of equal opportunities.


Major John Read - nominated by the Salvation Army

John Read is an experienced Salvation Army officer and from August 2009 will be the Salvation Army's Territorial Ecumenical Officer. He has a background in various aspects of ministry and a wealth of experience.


Revd Nezlin Sterling - nominated by the New Testament Assembly

Nezlin held management and leadership positions for 25 years and spent the last 5 years of her working career in the strategic role of Director of Nursing. She has a BA Honours degree in Management from Westminster University.

Currently she serves as:
• Member of the African & Caribbean Evangelical Alliance Trustee Board
• National & International General Secretary of the New Testament Assembly
• Associate Pastor of the Ealing New Testament Assembly
• Vice-chair of the Tooting Neighbourhood Centre (A community Project)
• Course Director & lecturer of the New Testament Assembly Institute of Theology & Christian Counselling
• Member of the Minority Ethnic Christian Affairs group
• Ecumenical member of the Church of England General Synod - representing Black Majority Churches and the New Testament Assembly

In the past Nezlin served as a Member of the Trustee Board of Christian Aid and Joint President of CTBI

Nominations from each of the four National Instruments

The Revd Paul Conroy - nominated by ACTS

Father Paul Michael Conroy PhL STL, is a priest of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Glasgow and General Secretary of the Bishops' Conference of Scotland. Following his ordination in 1980 he completed post-graduate studies in Theology and in Philosophy at the Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. On completion of his studies he was appointed to the staff of the Seminary in Glasgow, where he was a resident lecturer until 1995, by which time he was also Vice-rector and Director of Studies. In 1995 he took up an appointment as assistant priest in St. Andrew's Cathedral in Glasgow and was made Director of Pastoral Planning for the Archdiocese of Glasgow. In 1998 he was appointed parish priest of the parish of Our Lady and St. George in the Penilee area of Glasgow, while continuing as Director of Pastoral Planning. During this time he participated in and was a member of several local, regional and national ecumenical bodies, including the clergy fraternal and the Hillington-Cardonald-Penilee Inter Church Group.

In 2003 Paul was appointed Assistant General Secretary of the Bishops' Conference of Scotland. In 2005 he was appointed General Secretary of the Bishops' Conference of Scotland which includes responsibility for overseeing the financial, administration and human resourcing of the Conference. This position also brings involvement with a number of inter-Church and ecumenical bodies, including the Scottish Churches Committee, the Churches Legislation Advisory Service and the Prison Chaplaincy Steering Group. He is currently a member of the ACTS Mission Network and a member of the CTBI Senior Representatives' Forum. Among his interests he numbers art, cooking, current affairs and football.


The Right Reverend (John) Wyn Evans- nominated by CYTUN

Wyn Evans, 61, grew up in Aberystwyth, the son of the Vicar of Aberystwyth, Efion Evans. He was educated at Ardwyn Grammar School, Aberystwyth, then studied archaeology at the University of Wales, Cardiff. He trained for the priesthood at St Michael's College, Llandaff 1968-71 and has served all his ministry in the Diocese of St David's.

Ordained as a priest in 1972, Wyn served as a minor canon at St David's Cathedral from 1972-75. After a period of research at Oxford University he returned to Pembrokeshire, serving as Rector of Llanfallteg with Clunderwen and Hellan Amgoed with Llangan from 1977-82. He was Diocesan Warden of Ordinands from 1978-83, chaplain of Trinity College of Carmarthen 1982-90 and Diocesan Director of Education 1982-1992. He was made an honorary canon of St David's Cathedral 1988 and served as a canon from 1990 to 1994. From 1990-94 he was Dean of Chapel, Trinity College Carmarthen and head of department of religious studies 1991-94. He was made Dean and Precentor of St David's Cathedral in 1994 as well as Vicar of St David's. In 2001, the parish was enlarged into a Rectorial Benefice and renamed Dewisland, where he served as rector. He was elected Bishop of St David's in 2008

A keen historian, the bishop is an honorary fellow of the University of Wales, Lampeter, and a leading expert on the lives of the early Welsh saints and St David's Cathedral. He has recently edited a book titled, St David of Wales - Cult, Church and Nation.

He is married to Diane, a professional potter in St David's


Gillian Kingston - nominated by ICC

Gillian was born and educated in Cork, Ireland and has a degree in English Language and Literature from Trinity College, Dublin University. She is Lay Leader designate of the Conference of the Methodist Church in Ireland, Director of the Glenstal Ecumenical Conference and co-Chair of the Theological Forum of the Irish Inter-Church Meeting. She is Vice Chair of Christian Aid (Ireland) and the immediate past President of the Irish Council of Churches. She has a life-long involvement in things ecumenical, both in Ireland and further afield. For seven years she was Moderator of the Church Representatives' Meeting of CTBI.


The Rev Peter Whittaker - nominated by CTE

Peter Whittaker is a Methodist minister and also a husband, parent and grandparent. He has been a foster carer in the past. Currently he is Chair of West Yorkshire Methodist District. He is also Convenor/Chair of CTE Board and Enabling Group. His interests include ecumenism, evangelism, spirituality, inter-faith and generally the interface between church and society. He is a presenter on the Radio 4 Daily Service. He enjoys music, walking, holiday, watching sport and friendship.

Co-opted

HG Bishop Angaelos

Bishop Angaelos is General Bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church in the United Kingdom. Born in Cairo, but being educated and living in Australia, he returned to Egypt in 1990 to join the monastery and was consecrated a monk by His Holiness Pope Shenouda III; he served as Papal Secretary until 1995, when he was delegated by His Holiness to serve as a parish priest in the United Kingdom. In 1999 His Grace was consecrated General Bishop in the United Kingdom, whereupon his ministry has continued to expand. Bishop Angaelos is active ecumenically at local, national and international levels, as well as in the area of inter-religious relations. Currently His Grace holds numerous offices including: President of the Council of the Oriental Orthodox Churches in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland, co-founder and Co-Chair of the Catholic-Oriental Orthodox Regional Forum, Co-Chair of the Anglican-Oriental Orthodox Regional Forum and delegate of the Coptic Orthodox Church to the World Council of Churches. On the inter-religious front, Bishop Angaelos is moderator of the Churches' Inter-Religious Network for Churches Together in Britain and Ireland and a Scholar-Consultant for the Christian-Muslim Forum. His Grace is a patron of a wide variety of Christian and religious organizations. Bishop Angaelos also oversees a dynamic UK-based and international youth ministry and travels extensively around the world lecturing at conventions and conferences.

Richard Nicholls

Richard has been General Manager of the Baptist Union of Great Britain since 2003. The role, in conjunction with the General Secretary, provides leadership to the Union, with Richard having particular responsibility for managing staff, resources, governance structures and overall policies. Prior to joining the Union Richard was Human Resources Director for the MHA Care Group (Methodist Homes for the Aged) for five years and Chief Personnel Officer for Derby City Council for nine years.


Moderator - nominated by the Board of Trustees

Appointed at the AGM May 2009

Margaret Swinson has been a member of the General Synod of the Church of England since 1985. She has been involved with CTBI since its inception. She has served on various Boards and Councils of the Church of England including the Church Urban Fund, the Board of Social Responsibility, the Board of Mission and the Standing and Policy Committees. She is currently Chair of the House of Laity of the Diocesan Synod in Liverpool and serves on the Chapter of Liverpool Cathedral. Her day job is as a Chartered Accountant specialising in Corporate Tax and VAT, and she is also a non-executive director of the Mental Health and Learning Disability NHS Trust which serves Merseyside and South Lancashire and includes Medium and High Secure Services.





13 comments:

Anonymous said...

Zoompad

Jesus is coming, the signs are here, although for now we must continue to speak out.

John wards recent post was odd, my whole point is that the things that happened to me were so bizarre no one believes me, the police are fairly useless too in my area, more interested in persecuting victims than actually doing anything.

Here's something intersting, the stuff about McCormack and the knights templar meeting has been taken down from the web, we all have it copied and pasted though.

Ward specifically mentions the KT in his latest post.

The time will come when the people have had enough, I thought it would be the hospital cover up therehas just been over the baby deaths.

Understand this people, they are doing it also with abuse of children, they are capable of absolutely anything.

A friend

Anonymous said...

this is very interesting, at my childrens home where i was in the 70s boys were being taken out for the day by known homosexuals.
we wrote several times toa black activist nutjob called paul boating,
he did zillch, nothing and sod all about our letters of young boys being taken out and screwed by these poofs.

Zoompad said...

"John wards recent post was odd"

Which one?

"the stuff about McCormack and the knights templar meeting has been taken down from the web, we all have it copied and pasted though"

JOHN McCormack? Because he was one of the crafty dodgers on Mothers for Justice, and he told me he knew Dr Ludwig Lowenstein (Dr Frankenstein as I call him)

Please would you copy and paste the info about it here, thanks

Zoompad said...

"we wrote several times toa black activist nutjob called paul boating,
he did zillch, nothing and sod all about our letters of young boys being taken out and screwed by these poofs."

Is this him?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Boateng

Zoompad said...







British High Commissioner to South Africa



In office
14 March 2005 – 26 April 2009



Prime Minister

Tony Blair
Gordon Brown



Preceded by

Ann Grant



Succeeded by

Nicola Brewer



Chief Secretary to the Treasury



In office
29 May 2002 – 5 May 2005



Prime Minister

Tony Blair



Preceded by

Andrew Smith



Succeeded by

Des Browne



Financial Secretary to the Treasury



In office
8 June 2001 – 28 May 2002



Prime Minister

Tony Blair



Preceded by

Stephen Timms



Succeeded by

Ruth Kelly



Minister of State for the Home Office



In office
27 October 1998 – 8 June 2001



Prime Minister

Tony Blair



Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Department for Education and Employment (Minister for the Disabled)



In office
4 May 1997 – 27 October 1998



Prime Minister

Tony Blair



Preceded by

Alistair Burt



Succeeded by

Margaret Hodge



Member of Parliament
for Brent South



In office
11 June 1987 – 6 May 2005



Preceded by

Laurence Pavitt



Succeeded by

Dawn Butler



Personal details



Born

14 June 1951 (age 62)
Hackney, United Kingdom



Political party

Labour



Relations

Kwaku Boateng (father)



Alma mater

University of Bristol



Profession

Solicitor
Barrister



Religion

Methodism


Paul Yaw Boateng, Baron Boateng (born 14 June 1951) is a British Labour Party politician, who was the Member of Parliament (MP) for Brent South from 1987 to 2005, becoming the UK's first black Cabinet Minister in May 2002, when he was appointed as Chief Secretary to the Treasury. Following his departure from the House of Commons, he served as the British High Commissioner to South Africa from March 2005 to May 2009. He was introduced as a member of the House of Lords on 1 July 2010

Zoompad said...

Background and early life[edit]

Boateng was born in Hackney, London of mixed Ghanaian and Scottish heritage; his family later moved to Ghana when Boateng was four years old. His father, Kwaku Boateng, was a lawyer and cabinet minister under Kwame Nkrumah. There, Boateng attended Accra Academy High School. Boateng's life in Ghana came to an abrupt end with the jailing of his father in 1966 after a coup against Nkrumah. His father was imprisoned without trial for four years. Boateng, then 15, and his sister fled to Britain with their mother.

They settled in Hemel Hempstead where he attended Apsley Grammar School. He read law at the University of Bristol and began his career in civil rights, originally as a solicitor, though he later retrained as a barrister. He worked primarily on social and community cases, starting under renowned civil rights advocate Benedict Birnberg, involving women's rights, housing and police complaints, including a period from 1977-1981 as the legal advisor for the Scrap Sus Campaign. He represented Cherry Groce, a mother of six who was shot and paralysed by a police officer during a raid on her home in the search for her son.[2] He became a partner at the firm B M Birnberg & Co, and as a barrister, he practiced at Eight King's Bench Walk.

Zoompad said...

Boateng was elected to the Greater London Council for Walthamstow in 1981, which was then under the leadership of Ken Livingstone. Boateng was only the second person of Afro-Caribbean descent to be elected to the GLC. As chair of the GLC's police committee and vice-chair of its ethnic minorities committee, he advocated greater accountability in the Metropolitan Police and spoke out against racism in relation to their dealings with the black and Asian communities

Zoompad said...

He stood, and lost, as a parliamentary candidate for Hertfordshire West (which included his former home town of Hemel Hempstead) in the 1983 general election. He won in the general election of 1987, when he became the MP for Brent South in succession to Laurence Pavitt, being one of the first three black MPs (the others being Bernie Grant and Diane Abbott). During his victory speech he said: "We can never be free in Brent until South Africa is free too." He then famously declared, "Today Brent South, tomorrow Soweto!"

Like many other members of the left in the 1980s, he became more moderate under the leadership of Neil Kinnock, who made him a junior Treasury spokesman in 1989, making him the first black person to join the front bench as a party spokesperson. His portoflio included economics, industrial strategies and corporate responsibility.[3] In 1992, he became shadow minister for the Lord Chancellor's Department, a post he held until the 1997 general election, where he was a strong advocate for increasing pro bono legal services among UK law firms.[4]

Zoompad said...

With Labour's victory, Boateng became the UK's first black government minister as Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Department of Health, where he was responsible for social services and mental health. In that position, he published guidelines to end the denial of adoptions purely on the basis of race.[5]

In 1998 Boateng became a Minister of State at the Home Office and subsequently became Number 2 Minister at the home Office. He was made a Privy Councilor in 1999. He earned a reputation for being tough on crime, particularly with regards to aggressive begging on the streets.[6] He also worked with Eric Holder, who was then Deputy Attorney General, and Louis Freeh, then Director of the FBI on issues related to international drug trafficking and interdiction.[7]

His portfolio was expanded in 2000, and he became the first Minister for Young People, where his priority was to listen to and be a voice for Britain's youth.[8] He launched the Youth, Citizenship and Social Change programme, then the UK's largest research project designed to examine social exclusion and promoting citizenship among young people.[9] He also played a leading role in establishing and launching the £450m Children's Fund designed to tackle child poverty.[10] Boateng's ministerial colleagues encouraged him to stand as the Labour candidate to be the Mayor of London; however, he ruled himself out and strongly criticised his former GLC colleague Ken Livingstone. Boateng supported the candidacy of Frank Dobson, with whom he had served in the Department of Health.

Zoompad said...

In 2001, he was made Financial Secretary to the Treasury, and was promoted to the position of Chief Secretary to the Treasury in May 2002, making history as Britain's first black cabinet minister. He was quoted as saying "My colour is part of me but I do not choose to be defined by my colour." His appointment was greeted with praise by civil rights activists who said that his appointment gave hope to young black youths and would inspire them to become involved in politics.[11] To commemorate this historic achievement, Parliament commissioned a painting of Boateng by Jonathan Yeo, which is displayed in the collection of 21st Century Parliamentarians.[12]

In his role as Chief Secretary to the Treasury, he was responsible for finalising the Spending Review of 2002 and leading the Spending Review of 2004. Boateng, coordinating with Sir Peter Gershon's report, announced in 2004 the government's efficiency programme to save over £20 billion in the public sector.[13]

Boateng played a leading role in coordinating the Every Child Matters policy paper, which called for the reform of children's services, including greater accountability and coordination among government agencies.[14] He was also a passionate advocate for increasing development aid to Africa and the developing nations. Foreshadowing his future role, he made numerous trips to Africa, meeting with business and government leaders in an effort to highlight the fact that international aid and the Millenium Development Goals were key priorities for the government.[15][16][17] Boateng also assisted Gordon Brown in drafting the Africa Commission report, which called for increasing aid to Africa from Western nations to $50 billion a year[18][19] In March 2005, Boateng announced that he would not stand for re-election as an MP in the May 2005 general election. Dawn Butler was selected by the Constituency Labour Party to replace him and was elected in Brent South.

Zoompad said...

Due to Boateng's passion and enthusiasm for the government's Africa Commission Report and his associations with African leaders[20] Tony Blair named him to be the next High Commissioner to South Africa for a term of four years.[18][21] Many Africans praised the appointment, stating that it was an important symbolic break from Britain's colonial past and saw it as a symbol of Tony Blair's commitment to the continent. Boateng is credited with building a close relationship to South Africa's ANC government, and it was reported that he privately worked to bring together bitter rivals in the crisis in Zimbabwe, [22] although he publicly condemned the Zimbabwean government's illegal occupation of land from white farmers[23] and the resulting turmoil, which Boateng labeled a "human rights crisis."[24] He has also addressed the World Economic Forum on issues concerning Africa.[25][26] In 2008, he participated in a number of talks with political leaders in the United States to encourage them to support the Doha Development Round trade negotiations that would open Western markets to goods from Africa and other developing countries.[27] His tenure as High Commissioner ended in May 2009 following a request by the South African government due to allegations that his wife had verbally bullied the local domestic staff.

Zoompad said...

On 28 May 2010, it was announced in the 2010 Dissolution Honours that Boateng would become a member of the House of Lords.[28] He was introduced as Lord Boateng of Akyem and Wembley on 1 July 2010; he was supported by Lord Ouseley and Lord Janner. His maiden speech to the House of Lords highlighted the needs of poor and disadvantaged children, both in rural and urban areas. He called on the Government to examine the impact that the Budget and forthcoming Spending Review would have on children at risk.[29] In December 2011, he initiated a debate in the House of Lords to discuss cuts in funding to the Citizens Advice Bureau centres, which Lord Boateng vehemently opposed.[30]

Zoompad said...

Boateng is an active Methodist and Methodist lay preacher;[31] he served as a Methodist delegate to the World Council of Churches and as Vice-Moderator of its program to combat racism. He previously served on the board of the English National Opera (1984 to 1997) and the English Touring Opera (1993 to 1997). During the historic South African General Elections of 1994, he was a member of the delegation sent by the Association of Western European Parliamentarians Against Apartheid to monitor the elections. In 1993, he also wrote the foreword to the Harper Collins collected works edition of Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility.[32] He's been a commentator and television presenter, most notably for Channel 4's "Nothing But The Truth" and the BBC Radio 4's "Looking Forward to the Past."[33]

In 1988, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference honored Boateng as the recipient of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Award for his contributions to the field of civil rights.[34] He received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Lincoln University (Pennsylvania) in 2004[35] and the University of Bristol in 2007.[36] He is currently a non-executive Director of Aegis Defence Services, a private security, military and risk management company.[37][38] He also serves on the executive board of the international Christian charity, Food for the Hungry.[39