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Saturday, 17 December 2011

OPERATION ELVEDEN AND OPERATION WEETING

15 December 2011 Last updated at 20:10 Share this pageEmail Print Share this page

106ShareFacebookTwitter.Operation Elveden: Ex-crime editor held in police probe Operation Elveden was launched after claims journalists made illegal payments to police officers
The former crime editor at the now defunct News of the World newspaper, who was arrested over alleged payments to police officers, has been bailed.

Lucy Panton, 37, was arrested in Surrey by Operation Elveden detectives probing alleged police corruption.

She was arrested at 06:15 GMT and held at a south London police station before being bailed until late April.

Operation Elveden is running alongside the Operation Weeting investigation into phone hacking.

A BBC correspondent has witnessed bags of evidence and papers being seized from Ms Panton's home in Ashtead, Surrey, although officers there would not confirm they were from Operation Elveden.

It is the seventh arrest for the police operation into alleged police corruption.

Operation Weeting, which is investigating hacking of mobile phone voicemails of public figures by the News of the World, has resulted in 16 arrests.

Operation Elveden was launched after officers were handed documents suggesting journalists working for News International had made illegal payments to police officers.

Allegations of phone hacking and police payments led Met Police Commissioner Sir Paul Stephenson and Assistant Commissioner John Yates to resign, and the News of the World to close down after 168 years.

A Metropolitan Police spokesman said a woman had been arrested "on suspicion of committing offences involving making payments to police officers for information".

"She was arrested at a residential address in Surrey and has been taken to a south London police station where she remains in custody," he added.
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Operation Elveden
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Operation Elveden is a British police investigation.[1] It was opened as a result of documents provided by News International to the Operation Weeting investigation.[2]

According to the Metropolitan Police website, Operation Elveden is an investigation into allegations of inappropriate payments to police.[3] It is being supervised by the Independent Police Complaints Commission.[4]

The investigation is led by Deputy Assistant Commissioner Sue Akers of the Metropolitan Police Service,[2] who is also leading Operation Weeting and Operation Tuleta. The service's Directorate of Professional Standards is also involved in the investigation.[2] The Elveden suspects are given numbers to identify them.[2]

[edit] Arrests

As of the 15 December 2011 seven arrests have been made.[5][6] These include a journalist who works for News International was arrested and taken to a south west London police station on 4 November 2011.[7] He was later identified by the media as Jamie Pyatt of the Sun[8][9]

[edit] References

1.^ "Statement from Commissioner". Metropolitan Police Service. 6 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-07-07.
2.^ a b c d "Met chief: phone-hacking documents point to 'inappropriate payments'". The Guardian. 6 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-07-07.
3.^ "Man arrested in connection with phone hacking and corruption allegations". Metropolitan Police Service. 8 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-07-09.
4.^ "Phone hack victims could number 4,000 confirm Met Police". Channel 4 News. 7 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-07-00.
5.^ "Operation Elveden: Woman held in police payments probe". BBC News. 15 December 2011. Retrieved 15 December 2011.
6.^ "Operation Elveden arrest". Metropolitan police. 15 December 2011. Retrieved 15 December 2011.
7.^ "Man held in inquiry into payments to police". BBC News. 4 November 2011. Retrieved 4 November 2011.
8.^ "Police Payments: Sun Reporter Bailed By Met". Sky News. 5 November 2011. Retrieved 5 November 2011.
9.^ [1]

See also
Operation Weeting
Operation Tuleta
Operation Rubicon
Operation Motorman (ICO investigation)

[edit] External links
Operation Elveden collected news and commentary from The Independent
***************************************************************

Operation Weeting


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Operation Weeting is a British police investigation that commenced on 26 January 2011,[1] under the Specialist Crime Directorate of the Metropolitan Police Service[2] into allegations of phone hacking in the News of the World phone hacking affair.[3][4] The operation is being conducted alongside Operation Elveden, an investigation into allegations of inappropriate payments to the police by those involved with phone hacking,[5] and Operation Tuleta, an investigation into alleged computer hacking for the News of the World.[6] All three operations are led by Deputy Assistant Commissioner Sue Akers, Head of Organised Crime & Criminal Networks within the Specialist Crime Directorate.[7]

In August 2006, the News of the World's royal editor, Clive Goodman and a private investigator, Glenn Mulcaire, were arrested by the Metropolitan Police, and later charged with hacking the telephones of members of the royal family by accessing voicemail messages, an offence under section 79 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000.[8] On 26 January 2007, both Goodman and Mulcaire pleaded guilty to the charges and were sentenced to four and six months imprisonment respectively.[9] On the same day, it was announced that Andy Coulson had resigned as editor of the News of the World. In 2007, that appeared to be the end of the News of the World royal phone hacking scandal.

In July 2009, The Guardian newspaper published a series of allegations[10] that a culture of phone hacking went far beyond the single case of Goodman and Mulcaire's hacking of the royal household. It was alleged that a much wider range of people across different areas of public life, including the former deputy prime minister John Prescott,[11] the Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson, politicians Tessa Jowell and Boris Johnson,[12] publicist Max Clifford and even Rebekah Brooks, then editor of the News of the World's sister paper The Sun.[13] had been the victim of hacking ordered by the News of the World. The News of the World and its parent News Corporation strongly denied the allegations, and called on The Guardian to share any evidence it had with the police.[14][15] In the wake of the allegations, the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Sir Paul Stephenson asked the force's Assistant Commissioner John Yates to review the original 2006 investigation in the light of any new evidence, with regards to potentially reopening the investigation. In a single 8-hour meeting, Yates decided not to take any further action.[16]

In the wake of the police deciding not to instigate legal proceedings, several public figures who had allegedly been hacked began litigation proceedings against the News of the World's owner News International, and against the private investigator Glenn Mulcaire. Those who began legal action included the football agent Sky Andrew, actress Sienna Miller, actor Steve Coogan, television presenter Chris Tarrant and football pundit Andy Gray.[17] In the course of one of these litigation proceedings, that brought by Sienna Miller, papers lodged in the High Court suggested that Ian Edmondson, a senior editor at the News of the World, was involved in work undertaken by Mulcaire.[18] In the wake of this new evidence, News International group general manager Will Lewis was tasked with reviewing any documents relating to the 2006 Goodman case within the company's records and files. This review led Lewis to also re-examine all documents held by the legal firm Harbottle & Lewis, who had defended News International against an unfair dismissal case brought by Clive Goodman in 2007, in which he discovered questionable material. Lewis passed this material to a second legal firm, Hickman Rose, who in turn asked the former Director of Public Prosecutions Ken Macdonald to examine the evidence and report his findings to the News International board. Macdonald's report found evidence of indirect hacking, breaches of national security and serious crime, which led Macdonald to recommend that the company immediately referred the matter to the police; News International did.[19][20]

The Crown Prosecution Service announced an immediate review of the evidence collected during the Metropolitan Police's original investigation into phone hacking at the News of the World,[21] before the Metropolitan Police announced on 26 January 2011 that it was launching Operation Weeting, a new and fresh investigation into the entire phone hacking affair.[22]

[edit] Scope

In its initial months of existence, Operation Weeting had around 45 officers working on it.[23] In a report to Parliament on 20 July 2011, the Home Affairs Select Committee of the House of Commons recommended that additional resources be made available to the operation in order to speed up its progress;[24] later the same day, the Metropolitan Police announced that the number of officers assigned to Weeting was to be increased to its current level of 60.[25]

It is believed that around 3,000 people may have had their phones hacked,[26] a figure that was confirmed by DAC Akers at an evidence session of the Home Affairs Select Committee on 12 July 2011. At the same evidence session, Akers confirmed the police have contacted only 170 of the 3,870 people named in Glenn Mulcaire's files to date.[27] There were 11,000 pages of the evidence[27] with 5,000 landline phone numbers and 4,000 mobile phone numbers.[28] on them inside the so-called "Glenn Mulcaire files".[27]

During the investigations, documentation provided to Operation Weeting suggested that some police personnel may have accepted "inappropriate payments" from news organisations in return for classified information. As a result, the Metropolitan Police Service opened an additional investigation, Operation Elveden, which is also being led by Deputy Assistant Commissioner Akers.[1][29]

[edit] Arrests

As of 7 December 2011, 18 people have been arrested as part of Operation Weeting[30][31][32][33][34][35][36][37][38] They are:
Neville Thurlbeck [A], News of the World chief reporter. Thurlbeck was arrested on 5 April 2011 on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications, contrary to Section 1 (1) of the Criminal Law Act 1977, and unlawful interception of voicemail messages, contrary to Section 1 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) 2000.[39] Thurlbeck was released on bail later the same day, and is due to return in September.[40]
Ian Edmondson [B], former News of the World News Editor. Edmondson was arrested on 5 April 2011 on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications, contrary to Section 1 (1) of the Criminal Law Act 1977, and unlawful interception of voicemail messages, contrary to Section 1 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) 2000.[39] He was released on bail later the same day, and is due to return in September.[40]
James Weatherup [C], a News of the World assistant news editor. Weatherup was arrested on 14 April 2011 on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications, contrary to Section 1 (1) of the Criminal Law Act 1977, and unlawful interception of voicemail messages, contrary to Section 1 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) 2000.[41] Weatherup was bailed later the same day, and is due to return in September.[42]
Terenia Taras, freelance journalist. Taras was arrested and bailed on 23 June 2011 on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications, contrary to Section 1 (1) of the Criminal Law Act 1977. She is due to report back to a police station in October.[43][44]
Laura Elston [E], a Press Association royal correspondent. Elston was arrested on 27 June 2011 on suspicion of intercepting communications, contrary to Section 1 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) 2000, before being bailed to return in October. Elston's bail was cancelled on 18 July when she was informed that no further action would be taken against her.[45]
Andy Coulson, a former News of the World editor and former Downing Street Communications Director. Coulson was arrested on 8 July 2011 on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications, contrary to Section 1 (1) of the Criminal Law Act 1977, and of corruption, contrary to Section 1 of the Prevention of Corruption Act 1906.[46] Coulson was released on bail later the same day, and is due to return to police in October.[47]
Clive Goodman, a former News of the World royal editor who had previously been jailed in January 2007 for intercepting voicemail messages of members of the royal household. Goodman was arrested on 8 July 2011 on suspicion of corruption, contrary to Section 1 of the Prevention of Corruption Act 1906.[48] He was bailed on the same day, and is scheduled to return in October.[47]
An unidentified 63-year-old man who was arrested on 8 July 2011 on suspicion of corruption, contrary to Section 1 of the Prevention of Corruption Act 1906. He was bailed the following day, and is due to return in October.[47]
Neil Wallis, a former News of the World deputy editor. Wallis was arrested on 14 July 2011 on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications, contrary to Section 1 (1) of the Criminal Law Act 1977.[49] He was bailed on the same day to return in November.[50]
Rebekah Brooks, News International chief executive and former News of the World editor. Brooks was arrested on 17 July 2011 on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications, contrary to Section 1 (1) of the Criminal Law Act 1977, and of corruption, contrary to Section 1 of the Prevention of Corruption Act 1906. She was bailed that evening until October.[51]
Stuart Kuttner, former News of the World managing editor. Kuttner was arrested on 2 August 2011 on suspicion of corruption, contrary to Section 1 of the Prevention of Corruption Act 1906 and on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications, contrary to Section 1 (1) of the Criminal Law Act 1977.[31] He was initially released under police bail until the end of the month but was taken into custody again on 30 August and bailed until an unspecified date in September.[52]
Greg Miskiw, former News of the World news desk editor. Miskiw was arrested on 10 August 2011 on suspicion of corruption, contrary to Section 1 of the Prevention of Corruption Act 1906 and on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications, contrary to Section 1 (1) of the Criminal Law Act 1977.[32] He was bailed the following day to return in October.[53]
James Desborough, News of the World US editor. Desborough was arrested on 18 August 2011.[33]
A 35 year old man believed to be Dan Evans, a former reporter for News of the World, was arrested on 19 August 2011.[34]
A 30 year old man, whom The Guardian identified as Ross Hall, a former reporter for News of the World who wrote under the pen name of Ross Hindley,[54] was arrested on 2 September 2011. He was bailed the same day to return in mid-January 2012.[35]
A 35 year old man was arrested in an early morning raid on 7 September 2011[36] on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications, contrary to Section 1 (1) of the Criminal Law Act 1977.[55] He was bailed the same day until an unspecified date in October. The BBC identified the man as Raoul Simons, a journalist who worked for the Evening Standard and later as the deputy football editor of The Times.[56]
A 31 year old woman was arrested on 30 November 2011 on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications, contrary to the Criminal Law Act 1977. The media identifed her as Bethany Usher, a former journalist at News of the World and The People.[37] On 8 December 2011 the police announced that they would take no further action against the woman.[57]
A 41 year old man was arrested on 7 December 2011 "on suspicion of conspiring to intercept voicemail messages, contrary to Section 1 (1) Criminal Law Act 1977 and on suspicion of perverting the course of justice contrary to common law."[38] Media sources have identified him as the private investigator Glenn Mulcaire.[58]

[edit] Independent review

On 15 September 2011, the newly appointed Commissioner of the Metropolitan police, Bernard Hogan-Howe, announced that he had requested that Durham police carry out an independent review of the evidence collected by Operation Weeting. Hogan-Howe said that he had asked the team, lead by Durham chief constable Jon Stoddart, "to have a look at the inquiry to reassure us we are going in the right direction and I think we are."[59]

[edit] See also
Operation Elveden
Operation Tuleta
Operation Rubicon
Operation Motorman (ICO investigation)

[edit] References

1.^ a b "Statement from Commissioner". Metropolitan Police Service. 6 July 2011. Retrieved 7 July 2011.
2.^ PA (9 February 2011). "New angle in phone hacking probe". The Independent (UK). Retrieved 6 July 2011.
3.^ Wesley Johnson (6 July 2011). "Ex-phone hacking probe officer to face MPs". The Independent (UK). Retrieved 6 July 2011.
4.^ "McCann's spokesman talks to police in phone hacking probe". Leicester Mercury. 6 July 2011. Retrieved 6 July 2011.
5.^ "Man arrested in connection with phone hacking and corruption allegations". Metropolitan Police. 8 July 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
6.^ "Metropolitan Police starts computer hacking probe". BBC. 30 July 2011. Retrieved 1 August 2011.
7.^ "Statement regarding Operation Weeting". Metropolitan Police. 7 July 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
8.^ "Two charged in 'phone-tap' probe". BBC News. 9 August 2006. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
9.^ "Pair jailed over royal phone taps". BBC News. 26 January 2007. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
10.^ Davies, Nick (8 July 2009). "Trail of hacking and deceit under nose of Tory PR chief". The Guardian (UK). Retrieved 19 July 2011.
11.^ "Prescott calls for hacking probe". BBC News. 9 July 2009. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
12.^ Davies, Nick (1 February 2010). "News of the World pair hacked into 100 mobile accounts". The Guardian (UK). Retrieved 19 July 2011.
13.^ "Stars 'may sue' over phone claims". BBC News. 10 July 2009. Retrieved 5 April 2010.
14.^ "No inquiries, No charges, No evidence". News of the World (newsoftheworld.co.uk). 12 July 2009. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
15.^ "News International Statement on Guardian Article". News Corporation (newscorp.com). 10 July 2009. Retrieved 11 July 2011.
16.^ "Statement from AC John Yates". Metropolitan Police (met.police.uk). 9 July 2009. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
17.^ "Phone hacking probe: Key people". BBC News. 27 December 2010. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
18.^ Davies, Nick (15 December 2010). "Phone hacking approved by top News of the World executive – new files". The Guardian (UK). Retrieved 19 July 2011.
19.^ Glen Owen (19 July 2011). "Why did Prince William's lawyers hide hacking evidence? Firm that advises Royals entangled in row over 'cover up'". Daily Mail (UK). Retrieved 17 July 2011.
20.^ Robert Peston (10 July 2011). "News International found 'smoking gun' e-mails in 2007". BBC News. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
21.^ "Prosecutor orders review of phone-hacking evidence". The Spy Report (Media Spy). 15 January 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
22.^ "New investigation regarding alleged phone hacking". Metropolitan Police. 26 January 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
23.^ Cahal Milmo and Martin Hickman (24 June 2011). "Freelance reporter held in phone-hacking investigation". The Independent (UK). Retrieved 2011-07-06.
24.^ Home Affairs Select Committee (2011), Unauthorised tapping into or hacking of mobile communications, p. 60, retrieved 2011-07-20
25.^ "Phone hacking: Scotland Yard boosts probe team". BBC News. 20 July 2011. Retrieved 20 July 2011.
26.^ Rebecca Camber and Stephen Wright (10 February 2011). "Up to 3,000 may have been victims of phone hacking". Daily Mail (UK). Retrieved 6 July 2011.
27.^ a b c Hélène Mulholland, Alan Travis and Vikram Dodd (12 July 2011). "Thousands of hacking victims yet to be contacted, says Met's Sue Akers | Media | guardian.co.uk". Guardian (UK). Retrieved 12 July 2011.
28.^ Channel 4 News – News International failed to co-operate
29.^ Siddique, Haroon (6 July 2011). "Met chief: phone-hacking documents point to 'inappropriate payments'". The Guardian (UK). Retrieved 7 July 2011.
30.^ "Timeline of phone-hacking arrests". The Guardian (UK). 18 July 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
31.^ a b Amelia Hill (2 August 2011). "Phone Hacking: Stuart Kuttner arrested". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 2 August 2011.
32.^ a b "New arrest in phone-hacking inquiry". BBC News. 11 August 2011. Retrieved 10 August 2011.
33.^ a b "Phone hacking: Reports of James Desborough arrest". BBC News. 18 August 2011. Retrieved 18 August 2011.
34.^ a b "Phone hacking: Police officer arrested over leaks". BBC News. 19 August 2011. Retrieved 19 August 2011.
35.^ a b "Phone hacking: Man bailed in News of the World probe". BBC News. 2 September 2011. Retrieved 2 September 2011.
36.^ a b Weir, Keith (7 September 2011). "UPDATE 1-UK police make new arrest in phone hacking case". Reuters. Retrieved 7 September 2011.
37.^ a b "Phone hacking: Woman held in media probe". BBC News. 30 November 2011. Retrieved 30 November 2011.
38.^ a b Josh Halliday (7 December 2011). "Man arrested in connection with phone hacking". The Guardian. Retrieved 7 December 2011.
39.^ a b "Two arrested on suspicion of unlawfully intercepting voicemail messages". Metropolitan Police. 5 April 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
40.^ a b Hill, Amelia; Davies, Nick; Dodd, Vikram (6 April 2011). "Phone hacking: two News of the World journalists arrested". The Guardian (UK). Retrieved 19 July 2011.
41.^ "Arrest in phone hacking investigation". Metropolitan Police. 14 April 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
42.^ "News of the World journalist arrested in hacking probe". BBC News. 14 April 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
43.^ "Woman arrested by officers investigating phone hacking". Metropolitan Police. 23 June 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
44.^ "Operation Weeting latest: Woman bailed". Metropolitan Police. 23 June 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
45.^ "Bailed cancelled for woman". Metropolitan Police. 18 July 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
46.^ "Man arrested in connection with phone hacking and corruption allegations". Metropolitan Police. 8 July 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
47.^ a b c "Three bailed following Operation Weeting and Elveden arrests". Metropolitan Police. 11 July 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
48.^ "Further arrest in connection with allegations of corruption". Metropolitan Police. 8 July 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
49.^ "Man arrested in connection with phone hacking allegations". Metropolitan Police. 14 July 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
50.^ Morgan, Tom (14 July 2011). "Andy Coulson's deputy Neil Wallis arrested". The Independent (UK). Retrieved 19 July 2011.
51.^ "Rebekah Brooks arrested by hacking police". BBC News. 18 July 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011.
52.^ James Robinson (30 August 2011). "Phone hacking: NoW's former managing editor answers police bail". Guardian (London). Retrieved 2 September 2011.
53.^ Josh Halliday (11 August 2011). "Phone hacking: NoW's Greg Miskiw released on bail". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 11 August 2011.
54.^ James Robinson (2 September 2011). "Phone-hacking scandal: reporter linked to the 'for Neville' email arrested". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 5 September 2011.
55.^ Sandra Laville (7 September 2011). "Phone hacking: police make another arrest". Guardian (London). Retrieved 7 September 2011.
56.^ "Phone hacking police bail sports writer Raoul Simons". BBC News. 7 September 2011. Retrieved 7 September 2011.
57.^ Lisa O'Carroll (8 December 2011). "Former News of the World journalist to face no further action, say police". The Guardian. Retrieved 8 December 2011.
58.^ "Glenn Mulcaire 'arrested in phone-hacking probe'". BBC News. 7 December 2011. Retrieved 7 December 2011.
59.^ Sandra Laville (15 September 2011). "Phone hacking: Durham police called in to review evidence". The Guardian. Retrieved 15 September 2011.

[edit] External links
Operation Weeting collected news and commentary from The Independent
Statement from Commissioner, Metropolitan Police, 6 July 2011

20 comments:

Zoompad said...

FROM CRAIG MURRAYS BLOG

http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=operation%20elveden%20tom%20watson&source=web&cd=5&sqi=2&ved=0CEoQFjAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.craigmurray.org.uk%2Farchives%2F2011%2F07%2Fwhats-in-a-name%2F&ei=LbvsTozTG4Wg8QOZksyjCg&usg=AFQjCNF7BdoJp4jSgHu7YEkpQCwXAe-Sng&sig2=fO-_qLiOVlWjaEAbPbCsMg

« Sean Hoare – So Soon Forgotten


Agents Provocateurs »

What’s in a Name?

by craig on July 20, 2011 12:48 pm in Uncategorized


The police investigation into bribes to police officers by News of the World is called Operation Elveden. It has not identified, suspended or arrested a single bent cop.

What’s in a name? To Norfolk people Eleveden is a notorious bottleneck on the A11, the main road into and out of the county. You can, literally, queue for miles and for hours to get through Elveden in either direction. It is a place notorious to Norfolk for frustration, obstruction and never getting anywhere. I myself have spent a huge amount of time being stuck by Elveden; it is extremely difficult to avoid or get round. Elveden means no progress.

Andy Hayman was Chief Constable of Norfolk before moving down to the Met.

Did the Met name Operation Elveden as a grim in-joke to indicate they would make sure the accusations never went anywhere?

UPDATE

I have just realised I am definitely right. Operation Weeting is the investigation into the News of the World phone hacking itself. Weeting is the village at the southern end of the notorious Elveden traffic jam.

Zoompad said...

Tom Watson MP




House of Commons, London, SW1A 0AA



The Rt Hon David Cameron MP

Prime Minister

10 Downing Street

London

SW1A 2AA





4 October 2010







Dear Mr Cameron,



NEWS OF THE WORLD PHONE HACKING SCANDAL



You will be aware of the Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee’s Press Standards, Privacy and Libel report of February 2010 in which Mr Andy Coulson, your Communications Director, told MPs that he had no recollection of incidences where phone hacking took place whilst he was Editor of the News of the World.



New allegations made today to Channel 4’s Dispatches programme, by a former senior executive of News International, however, claim that Mr Coulson did in fact know about hacking, and that he listened to tapes of intercepted voicemail messages. These allegations are new, far reaching and warrant investigation.



The report to be broadcast on the Dispatches programme casts doubt on the accuracy of the oral evidence provided to the Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee on 21 July 2009 by Mr Coulson in which he said: “I was, as you know, Editor of the News of the World for four years from January 2003 until January 2007. During that time I never condoned the use of `phone hacking and nor do I have any recollection of incidences where `phone hacking took place”.



Accordingly, I think it is necessary for you to make a statement in Parliament on this matter next week. If a government minister were to be the subject of similar allegations, they would be forced to stand down immediately while an investigation is carried out. We are now at the point where I firmly believe you should consider a similar course of action with regards to Mr Coulson’s conduct.


I am sure you would agree misleading a parliamentary committee of the House of Commons is a very serious matter, and therefore these allegations need to be investigated. Parliament and the public would expect nothing less from you.


I look forward to hearing from you, at the earliest opportunity, in response to the points that I have raised.

Yours sincerely

Tom Watson

Member of Parliament for West Bromwich East

Zoompad said...

LIKE I HAVE SAID MANY A TIME (PLEASE TAKE THE COTTON WOOL OUT YOUR LUG HOLES SO YOU CAN HEAR ME) TOM WATSON IS INVOLVED WITH SEARCHLIGHT WHICH WAS SET UP BY A PAEDOPHILE CALLED HARRY BIDNEY.

Zoompad said...

David Cameron has been tricked and led like a bear with a ring through its nose, by some right nasty scumbags.

ie, the ones at this conference, these ghastly men, one of whom is now dead, tried to do whatever they could to cover up institutional child abuse, and they tricked David Cameron.

http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=bob%20woffingden%20%20david%20cameron%20richard%20webster%20david%20rose&source=web&cd=12&ved=0CCMQFjABOAo&url=http%3A%2F%2Fzoompad.blogspot.com%2F2011%2F02%2Finfluence-dodgy-journalists-can-have.html&ei=Jb3sTp6AAcWo8APCht3zCQ&usg=AFQjCNFJcwbaqFpw7HQgprJ-OXDhk-cbbw&sig2=ie0XMg1Hignw3kzffy8RvQ

Zoompad said...

http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=mr%20chris%20mullin%2C%20in%20the%20chair%20david%20cameron%20david%20rose&source=web&cd=5&sqi=2&ved=0CEQQFjAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.publications.parliament.uk%2Fpa%2Fcm200102%2Fcmselect%2Fcmhaff%2F836%2F2051401.htm&ei=B77sTouQK4LP8QOfj-GKCg&usg=AFQjCNFuQD7mui5DHOrTQPUnCidXsYZhYw&sig2=HqFMcTam3S-dsJdZU8G3rw

Home Affairs - Minutes of Evidence[Back to Report]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Here you can browse the Minutes of Evidence which were ordered by the House of Commons to be printed 22 October 2002.



TUESDAY 14 MAY 2002




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Members present:






Mr Chris Mullin, in the Chair

Mr David Cameron
Bob Russell

Mrs Janet Dean
Mr Marsha Singh

Bridget Prentice
Angela Watkinson

Mr Gwyn Prosser
David Winnick





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


CONTENTS

Examination of Witnesses

MR DAVID ROSE, Special Investigations Reporter, The Observer, MR RICHARD WEBSTER, Author of "The Great Children's Home Panic", and MR BOB WOFFINDEN, Freelance Investigative Journalist, examined.

Question Number

38-59

60-79

80-99

100-120

Zoompad said...

Leveson inquiry: Sean Hoare's brother to appear

Brother of whistleblower to give evidence on same day next week as former News of the World editor Piers Morgan
Lisa O'Carroll

guardian.co.uk, Friday 16 December 2011 16.28 GMT
Article history

Sean Hoare made fresh allegations against his former employer in the New York Times in late 2010. Photograph: News International/PA


The brother of Sean Hoare, the former News of the World reporter who blew the whistle on phone hacking, is to appear on same day as Piers Morgan at the Leveson inquiry into press ethics next week.


Stuart Hoare is expected to be asked what his brother, who was found dead at his home in July, had said about the culture and work practices at the Sunday tabloid.


An inquest in November heard that Hoare suffered from alcoholic liver disease and died of natural causes.


Stuart told the inquest the medical evidence "reflected the deterioration and stress he was under for the last few months".


Hoare made fresh allegations against his former employer in the New York Times in late 2010 and the coroner told how he had been "indicating that he was drinking as a crutch" following these revelations.


He will appear on Monday as will James Hanning, the deputy editor of the Independent on Sunday, who is expected to testify about Hoare.


It is understood Stuart Hoare told police that Sean "trusted" him and he may have been invited to appear at the inquiry for this reason.


Hanning has also taken a keen interest in phone hacking. He is currently updating his biography of David Cameron to include a reference to the scandal and the prime minister's handling of former News of the World editor Andy Coulson's resignation as his head of communications.

Zoompad said...

Also on next week is Matt Driscoll, a former sports reporter on the News of the World, who is testifying on Monday.


He won almost £800,000 at an employment tribunal in 2009 for unfair dismissal and disability discrimination.


Talkshow host Piers Morgan, the former editor of the Daily Mirror and the News of the World, is to appear before the Leveson inquiry on Tuesday.


He will give evidence by satellite from Los Angeles and is expected to be quizzed about his public statements about celebrities, phone hacking and his experience at the helm of two of the country's best-selling newspapers.


Sharon Marshall, the former TV editor of the News of the World, is also expected to testify on Tuesday alongside Christopher Johnson, Matthew Bell and Steve Turner. It is understood that Leveson has called Marshall as a witness because of her book Tabloid Girl.

Julian Pike, a partner at law firm Farrer & Co, is to appear for a second time on Tuesday. He may be quizzed on the circumstances surrounding a legal action taken by Sienna Miller over phone hacking.


The inquiry will take testimony for just three days next week.


On Wednesday it will hear from former Mirror journalist James Hipwell, the former financial journalist who was jailed for insider trading offences at the Daily Mirror where he co-wrote the "City Slickers" column before being sacked in 2000.


Following his release in 2006, he alleged that phone hacking had taken place at the Mirror and said he was writing a book that would expose tabloid practices.


David Pilditch, a former colleague of Hipwell's at the Mirror and journalist Padraic Flanagan will also appear on Wednesday.


• To contact the MediaGuardian news desk email editor@mediaguardian.co.uk or phone 020 3353 3857. For all other inquiries please call the main Guardian switchboard on 020 3353 2000. If you are writing a comment for publication, please mark clearly "for publication".

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Zoompad said...

Sean Hoare: a charmer who would make a story sing

Before he was recruited by the News of the World, Sean Hoare took me under his wing on our local paper
Comments (81)
Simon Ricketts

guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 19 July 2011 17.47 BST
Article history


Former News of the World journalist Sean Hoare, who was found dead at his home on Monday. Photograph: Reuters


Sean Hoare only ever spoke in a whisper. Almost conspiratorial, but filled with warmth and friendliness, his voice was low and husky, fuelled by the cigarettes he constantly smoked.

It didn't matter how important or innocent the subject matter was, Sean would lean in close to me and slide the words out of the side of his mouth. There was always a sparkle in his eye, always a joke in the information he was giving. It immediately made me feel that I was in "his gang". I was with him.

I met Sean in 1992 when I was an untrained work experience reporter at the local newspaper, The Watford Free Observer. I had been given a week of unpaid work to try to impress the bosses. I was nervous, anxious to succeed, but in a world that I knew very little about.

Sean pulled out the seat next to him and invited me to sit down. "Ricketts, Ricketts, not related to the local butchers are you? They're called Ricketts." I told him I wasn't. "Shame. I could have done with some cheap steak for my dinner."

Immediately, Sean took me under his wing. He spoon-fed me the better stories, showed me how to craft an intro, how to use quotes to the most effect and what made a story "sing".

Zoompad said...

After a few hours with Sean, I started to see the "angle" of every news story in the paper. He would leaf through the pages, point out good examples and bad examples. I was learning so fast on the job that I almost filled an entire notebook with his advice. I will never forget his generosity and warmth.

Later in the week, Sean came over and handed me a piece of paper with an address on it. "It's a good story. Get down there and get the quotes," he whispered in my ear. I did what he said and then nervously returned to the office. Tapping away at the keyboard, I wrote and rewrote the story, trying my best to make it "sing".

When I finished, Sean slid across to have a look. He got my notebook out and read my scrawling handwriting. He looked back at the screen. Sean worked quickly on my story. He tweaked it and edited it. He put in the best quotes, some of which I had left in my notebook. He improved it enormously. He made it work.

The editor decided to put the story on the front page of the paper. He asked who had written it. Quickly, seamlessly, Sean nodded to me. "The butcher's boy did it."

When the papers were delivered to the office, Sean went out to grab a bundle. He took the top copy and walked over. He handed it to me with a flourish and leaned in. "Congratulations on your first splash, old son," he said.

Sean's eye for a story, his love of the newspaper industry and his passion for a scoop soon meant he was on his way to the nationals. All of us who worked with him knew that was a perfect fit. He could charm a story out of a concrete post and we all got a buzz when we saw Sean's name cropping up in the showbiz columns.

I saw Sean occasionally after he left the local paper. Always the same, always with a cheeky grin and always asking if you had anything for him – a story he could work on.

Years later, I got a huge shock when I saw the face of a childhood friend on the front page of every national newspaper. It was Nick Leeson, who had been arrested for his part in the Barings Bank collapse. The unsettling sight of Nick, a cheeky-faced guy who I had been in the Cub Scouts with, being vilified across the country was only just sinking in when another familiar face turned up. It was Sean Hoare, who was now working for News International. He was digging for information, wanting the scoop about the Watford boy gone bad and was offering me larger and larger amounts of money to point him in the right direction.

I had to refuse. I told Sean I wouldn't help him. Nick and I were not bosom buddies but I didn't want to "sell him out" at a time when his life was collapsing around him.

Sean tried to charm me. He really did. Then he gave in. "That's what I've always liked about you, Simon. You've got principles. I should have remembered that."

Well, Sean – in standing up to be counted against the repugnant wrongdoing at the News of the World — showed everybody he had principles. It took a brave man to do what he did.

And now, of course, it is my turn to be shocked again. Sean is dead. He died yesterday at his home.

There is Sean's face on the front page of the newspapers. That cheeky smile, the sparkle in his eye, the cigarette dangling from his lips. I can almost hear him whispering: "Well, old son, this is a story, isn't it?"

Zoompad said...

Comments in chronological order (Total 81 comments)
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blackiris
19 July 2011 6:02PM


Strange timing...

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marionl
19 July 2011 6:04PM


awfully strange and convenient timing......

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nicemandan
19 July 2011 6:05PM


R.I.P to a key witness...

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BunkumBuster
19 July 2011 6:10PM


Mr. Hoare was the key witness that could have sent Rupert, Rebekah, and condomhead to jail. But please, don't let me interrupt your idiotic anecdotes.

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fishbone342
19 July 2011 6:11PM


He didn't die after a walk in woodland did he??

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DanielMcGrath
19 July 2011 6:12PM


I hate it when witnesses die a few days before Patliamentary hearings.

Just Hate It!

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BunkumBuster
19 July 2011 6:15PM


If this had happened in Iran, the Guardian would be hyperventilating till it's blue in the face. Here in the good old cradle of democracy, the Tory PM gets caught in bed with Rupert, Rebekah, and the met chief, and then the key witness to this glorious orgy gets bumped off, and we're still telling Gaddafi what a stinker he is with a straight face.

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nicemandan
19 July 2011 6:16PM


@fishbone342
No, but I suspect the same people were walking their dog nearby.

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DanielMcGrath
19 July 2011 6:16PM


Awight. Move along 'ere nuffingk to see 'ere. On your way chum.

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dredscott
19 July 2011 6:18PM


If I'm reading this article correctly, then underneath the weirdness there seems to be an attempt by the author to distance themselves from any future accusations, (which no one seems to be levelling, yet), of personal journalistic wrong doing, "That's what I've always liked about you, Simon. You've got principles. I should have remembered that." by citing a posthumous witness.
Weird, weird, weird.

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Eques
19 July 2011 6:19PM


This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn't abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs.




bodge
19 July 2011 6:21PM


I love conspiracy theories,the truth is so tedious.

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DanielMcGrath
19 July 2011 6:31PM


I am a coincidence theorist.


Its a coincidence between the press, police and politicians. Very much so.

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bodge
19 July 2011 6:43PM


dredscott

I'm with you on this ,its a bit strange when a journalist tells us he was told he has principles by a man who is not with us anymore.My view is that if a journalist says he has principles it would be best to count the cutlery before he leaves.

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andyrev
19 July 2011 7:14PM


Creepy.

It just goes to show you can never be too careful...

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Ernekid
19 July 2011 7:16PM


Murder?

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ronisher
19 July 2011 7:36PM


Yes, and no doubt the MET POLICE are gathering all the evidence they can and conducting the necessary investigations.... poor man, his death serves the police, the government and the NEWS INTERNATIONAL- how on earth can he ever get justice. We want an AUTOPSY..

Zoompad said...

Sean Hoare, former NOTW journalist, found dead in Watford home


Former News of the World journalist Sean Hoare, who turned whistleblower over the phone hacking scandal, has been found dead. The body of the showbusiness reporter was discovered in his Watford flat.


Related Tags: Sean Hoare David Cameron John Yates..


Former News of the World reporter Sean Hoare was found dead in his home in Watford (Pic: PA)

Police said Mr Hoare's death was ‘unexplained’ but not suspicious.

It came on the day Met Police second-in-command John Yates quit over the scandal and David Cameron cut short an overseas trip to deal with the political crisis.


Odds on the prime minister being the next cabinet member to leave office were slashed.

Mr Hoare was the first journalist from the now-defunct tabloid to speak out publicly about phone hacking.


He alleged Andy Coulson, Mr Cameron’s former spin doctor, was aware of hacking when he edited the paper.

Mr Hoare worked on the Sun before being recruited to work on the NotW by Mr Coulson, who resigned from No.10 earlier this year and was arrested by detectives two weeks ago.

A post-mortem examination into Mr Hoare's death was taking place on Tuesday morning as police continued to investigate the death.

A Hertfordshire Police spokeswoman said: 'The man's next of kin have been informed and the family are being supported by police at this sad time.'

Officers have yet to confirm arrangements for an inquest to be opened.
.

Read more: http://www.metro.co.uk/news/869712-sean-hoare-former-notw-journalist-found-dead#ixzz1gooFUB00

Zoompad said...

Sean Hoare: Toxicology



P. John made this Freedom of Information request to Forensic Science Service Ltd

Response to this request is delayed. By law, Forensic Science Service Ltd should normally have responded promptly and by 8 December 2011 (details)


P. John

9 November 2011


Dear Forensic Science Service Ltd,

the journalist Sean Hoare died on 17 July 2011.

I understand that the Coroner is awaiting the completion of
Toxicology tests before commencing an inquest, which I am assuming
would be the responsibility of the FSS.

Please could you disclose to me
- confirmation that the FSS have engaged in toxicology tests
associated with Sean Hoare's death
- all correspondence (post, fax, email) the FSS has exchanged with
the Coroner concerning this matter
- all correspondence (post, fax, email) the FSS has exchanged with
Herts Police concerning this matter
- all correspondence (post, fax, email) the FSS has exchanged with
pathologists concerning this matter
- all correspondence (post, fax, email) the FSS has exchanged with
Home Office concerning this matter
- the nature of the tests being conducted by the FSS
- the date when toxicology tests are forecast to be complete

Yours faithfully,
P John

Link to this | Send follow up




P. John left an annotation (12 November 2011)


While waiting for a response from the FSS, a note received from Hertfordshire Coroner Services which might suggest toxicology is complete;

"I am directed by HM Coroner to inform you that the inquest into the death of Sean Matthew HOARE will be held:

At: The Old Courthouse, St Albans Road East, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL10 0ES

On: Wednesday 23rd November 2011

At: 14:30

Yours sincerely
Julie Westwood
Senior Coroners Officer"

Link to this

Zoompad said...

Martin Hickman
Following stints with Reuters and the Press Association, Martin Hickman joined The Independent as a news editor in 2001. He became the Consumer Affairs Correspondent in September 2005 and has run the paper's trenchant campaigns on packaging, bank charges and factory-farmed chicken. He writes on subjects as diverse as food, finance, energy and fashion. He is currently writing a book about phone hacking with Tom Watson MP.

Zoompad said...

THE INDEPENDANT

Martin Hickman: Was Sean Hoare killed by the Murdoch empire? The short answer is no


Martin Hickman Wednesday 20 July 2011

Sean Hoare looks likely to take his place behind Princess Diana and David Kelly in the roll call of controversial deaths. Within hours of reports of his untimely demise, conspiracy theorists were questioning whether he had been murdered.

"Another murder cover-up?" asked one online. Another wrote: "Nothing that the British police can say will convince me that Sean Hoare's death was natural causes."

The decision of many newspapers, but not The Independent, to splash on the sensational death of the "phone-hacking whistleblower" posed the question in some readers' minds: was this man killed by the Murdoch empire? The answer is – unexcitedly but almost certainly – "no".

True, we do not yet have all the facts, but there are many reasons why Mr Hoare's death presents no more of a conspiracy than the failure of Princess Diana to fasten her seatbelt while being driven through the Pont de l'Alma road tunnel in Paris in 1997.

Firstly, Mr Hoare was not in possession of unique information about the wrongdoing at the News of the World, nor was he the only one to point the finger at Andy Coulson, its former editor. During its excellent investigation into the "hack attack" last year, The New York Times spoke to 12 current or former NOTW staff, who said hacking was rife.

Secondly, the new inquiry into phone hacking, Operation Weeting, was always unlikely to base its case on the testimony of one ex-employee. While statements may form part of its case, a much bigger part will rely on emails discovered or forensically recovered from News International's digital archive, electronic payment invoices and phone records.

Even if Weeting were to make personal testimony central, it was unlikely to have been Mr Hoare's, since he had been dismissed from the NOTW for drink and drug problems and could be portrayed as an unreliable witness.

Thirdly, the (unspoken but tangible) suggestion that News International might want to send death squads scuttling round Britain to silence witnesses is absurd, and especially so given the trouble it already faces.

Notwithstanding its dark arts, deceit and links to criminals, NI's new strategy is PR-led; it wants to now co-operate with the police and apologise for the mess.

Fourthly, Mr Hoare's death is not being investigated by the Metropolitan Police but by the Hertfordshire force, whose statement that the death was not thought to be suspicious was probably a disappointment to Hertfordshire's best detectives, who may have been only too keen to get one over on their big city colleagues.

Finally, Mr Hoare was not in good health. He was reported to be looking yellow and his doctor had remarked that he should have been dead.

And this is where Mr Hoare almost certainly was a "victim" of News International. He was told to do whatever it took to get the story; he went on marathon benders and snorted coke with rock stars. He had some great times as a show business journalist. But he decided to tell the truth about the illegal methods used to land stories. In that he was brave, and that is what he should be remembered for, not the manner of his passing.

Zoompad said...

That's one book I won't be bothering to buy. I get fed enough lies already via the British Brainwashing Corporation.

Zoompad said...

Martin Hickman: This marks an explosive development in the scandal
Analysis

Martin Hickman Saturday 30 July 2011
The expansion of Operation Tuleta from a "scoping exercise" to a full-blown investigation will open a new and explosive instalment in the phone-hacking scandal.

For a start, detectives are likely to investigate more egregious news-gathering techniques than phone hacking: computer hacking, burglary and "blagging" personal data.

Some of the targets of these techniques had more to lose than their privacy. While vile and disgusting, the alleged eavesdropping of Milly Dowler, war widows and Sara Payne did not endanger life and limb. The alleged targeting of ex-intelligence officers with knowledge of IRA informers could have.

Tuleta may also draw other titles and newspaper groups into the scandal. It is likely to focus on the activities of Jonathan Rees, a private detective who worked for News International and the Mirror Group. While police investigated Mr Rees over the murder of his business partner Danny Morgan in 1987, they bugged his office and recorded his conversations with reporters.

Mr Rees was acquitted of murder in March, but soon after fresh claims were made about his work for newspapers. Several of his reported victims such as Jack Straw and Peter Mandelson asked police if they had been targeted. That pressure may have persuaded Scotland Yard that the best way to end this scandal once and for all is to investigate all the "dark arts", not just phone hacking.

Zoompad said...

"Tuleta may also draw other titles and newspaper groups into the scandal."

Except the Guardian.

The Good Old Guardian, the mouthpiece of Searchlight (which Tom Watson MP belongs to).

Searchlight, set up by Harry Bidney the Soho gangster/paedophile.

Searchlight Pervert - Searchlight Exposed.com





searchlightexposed.com/searchlightpervert.htm


Harry Bidney – Searchlight's Pervert Hero. Harry Bidney was manager of the Limbo Club in Soho , which should have been warning enough. He was also ...


Aryan Unity - Searchlight - Time to come out of the closet





www.aryanunity.com/bidney.html


The leader of the 62 Group was one Harry Bidney, who received a grovellingly flattering obituary in. Searchlight when he died a couple of years ago. Bidney ...

Zoompad said...

This article first appeared in the December 1996 issue of the old Nationalist magazine VANGUARD. The MI5 rag Searchlight is still around today, with the sole purpose of spreading gossip and outright lies and therefore creating dischord inside the Nationalist movement as the majority of its readers seem to be our own people. We would advise everyone to boycott this rag, you don't want it to be known that you're paying for a bunch of nonces to carry on with their perversion.
EXPOSING THE HATEMONGERS

SEARCHLIGHT - Time to
come out of the closet

By A. DRUMMOND

BELIEVING Searchlight - the so-called 'anti-fascist magazine' - has just cost the BBC half a million quid. That is the extent of costs and damages the Beeb had to shell out when they gave up trying to defend a libel case brought by Tory M.P.'s Neil Hamilton and Gerald Howarth over the notorious Panorama programme 'Maggie's Militant Tendency' broadcast in February 1984.

Most of the paranoid drivel making up this programme was, the BBC admitted, supplied by Searchlight. Searchlight editor Gerry Gable was credited at the end of the programme, and three other 'researchers' similarly credited subsequently gave their address as that of Gable's rag. Although we hold no particular brief for Tory M.P.'s, the outcome of this case will have done a public
service if it teaches the media to think twice before using Searchlight stories, and if it serves to further discredit the rag as any sort of serious and honest source of information.

A major factor in the BBC's decision to chuck in the towel and conceed the libel case is understood to have been the threat of disclosures in court by the plaintiffs of the unsavoury background of Communism, organised crime and sexual perversion involving children underlying Searchlight,
disclosures which would have finished the smear sheet for good.

As it is, it has finally been disclosed in the mass media that Searchlight editor, Gable, and the magazine's founder Maurice Ludmer, are - or were in the deceased Ludmer's case - Communists who both stood as candidates for the Communist Party of Great Britain in local elections. This of course makes a mockery of their claim to be 'defending democracy', as the CPGB believes, or then
believed, in setting up a 'dictatorship of the proletariat'.

Still to be publically revealed is the criminal connection. Gable is a convicted burglar. His staff writer Manny Carpel has just done time for arson, and has convictions for sickening violence. Both Carpel and Gable are former members of the '62 Group', a band of Zionist thugs closely linked to organised
gangsterism in London's seedy Soho area.

Zoompad said...

HOMOSEXUAL PIMP

The leader of the 62 Group was one Harry Bidney, who received a grovellingly flattering obituary in
Searchlight when he died a couple of years ago. Bidney whose long criminal record opened with a
conviction in 1950 for selling black market silk stockings in a market in Boston, Lincs ran the Coffee Pot, a sleazy cafe in Soho's Berwick Street which was one of the earliest centres of hard drug trafficking in London. But his real profession as emerged in court convictions, was pimping for homosexual paedophiles, supplying them with under-aged boys obtained from Piccadilly's notorious 'meat rack'.

Searchlight's hero and guru was himself a pervert: his tastes ran to homosexually raping 13 year-old boys of 'Nordic' appearance whilst Nazi marching music played in the background! In 1978 Bidney and a rich Jewish businessman (also a generous contributor to 'anti-fascist' causes) for whom he pimped, were convicted of disgusting offences involving young boys.


Bidney, Gable and Carpel's 62 Group was itself an offshoot of the 43 Group. This 'anti-fascist' gang of hoodlums, which included Bidney, was led by one Jack 'Spot' Comer, a 1950's Soho gangland baron and vice racketeer.

The 43 Group had to cease trading when the Jewish Board of Deputies denounced it for extorting money with menaces from Jewish shopkeepers - if they didn't pay exorbitant rates to 'advertise on programmes' of dances run by the Group at the Dorchester Hotel (then run by Jews rather than Arabs), mysterious 'fascists' broke their windows!

The 43 Group was politically linked to Herut, and its terrorist arm, the Irgun Zvei Leumi, better known as the Stem Gang. This murdered and tortured British Servicemen in Palestine in the 1940's. It was founded by one Ze'ev Jabotinsky in 1943 (as in '43 Group).

Jabotinsky was a Fascist, a self-proclaimed admirer of Mussolini (whose Fascist grand Council was at one stage one-third Jewish, including the then Chief Rabbi of Italy). Jabotinsky's terrorism aided the Axis war effort in the latter stages of the War, tying down in Palestine British soldiers badly
needed in the European theatre.

Zoompad said...

FASCIST 'ANTI-FASCISTS?'

It is ironic that Searchlight is always accusing British Nationalists of 'being part of an international fascist terrorist conspiracy' when on far more substantial evidence the 'anti-fascist journal' could itself be linked with not only international Fascist terrorism but also Soho gangsterism and the sordid sex slavery of little boys.

No wonder they didn't want all this coming out in court in a blaze of publicity, and bolted, leaving their hapless mugs at the BBC in the lurch, to pick up the bill and, in some cases, possibly lose their jobs. Not that it will do them any good: the beans on Searchlight will soon be well and truly spilled when the NF publishes its already researched and long- awaited in-depth expose on it.

The disgusting creeping things that hide under Searchlight's little stone may think they got off lightly on the Panorama libel case. But the daylight will soon be shining in. Then watch Gable and Co. writhe!.